Drive: Henry Ford, George Selden, and the Race to Invent the Audio Age: Audiobook Review

Here’s the description from Amazon:

“From the acclaimed author of Birdmen comes a revelatory new history of the birth of the automobile, an illuminating and entertaining true tale of invention, competition, and the visionaries, hustlers, and swindlers who came together to transform the world.”

Drive: Henry Ford, George Selden, and the Race to Invent the Auto Age, written by Lawrence Goldstone, narrated by Christopher Price, and offered by Audible, begins in the early 1900s, when autos were luxuries and the leisure class watched auto races in France.

While other car manufacturers catered to the rich, and offered enticing and increasingly expensive luxury autos, Henry Ford had a brilliant plan: he’d make the auto as accessible as the radio for every American family. He created an automobile factory where every machine produced only one component part and produced it perfectly.

Interspersed with the story of Ford’s genius, is the tale of George Selden, another brilliant man who received a United States patent for an automobile in 1895. Ford becomes embroiled in years of litigation over the Selden patent and of course ultimately triumphs on appeal. Although Ford always had critics, his determination never faltered. Drive is a great story about Henry Ford’s vision to transform 20th century life through automobiles.

If you click on the cover image for Drive above, it will take you directly to the Amazon page where you can listen to an Audible sample.

Disclosure: I received a copy of Drive: Henry Ford, George Selden, and the Race to Invent the Auto Age from Audible in exchange for an honest review. This post contains affiliate links.

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