Mailbox Monday

I love the idea of reading about the Wizard of Oz from the viewpoint of Dorothy’s dog, Toto. Here’s the description from Amazon:

“The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was written in 1900 by L. Frank Baum. Many other Oz books followed, as well as the famous 1939 movie. Not until now, however, does Toto tell the story, as he remembers it. In Toto’s Tale, we read his version of the beloved adventures. Toto tells how he first found Dorothy when she arrived in Kansas on an orphan train and how they were both adopted by Aunt Em and Uncle Henry. In the end, he says, the silver shoes (not ruby slippers as in the movie) weren’t lost in the desert, but put to good use.”

Here is the description from Amazon:

“In the summer of 1978, residents of Love Canal, a suburban development in Niagara Falls, NY, began protesting against the leaking toxic waste dump in their midst-a sixteen-acre site containing 100,000 barrels of chemical waste that anchored their neighborhood. Initially seeking evacuation, area activists soon found that they were engaged in a far larger battle over the meaning of America’s industrial past and its environmental future. The Love Canal protest movement inaugurated the era of grassroots environmentalism, spawning new anti-toxics laws and new models of ecological protest.

Historian Richard S. Newman examines the Love Canal crisis through the area’s broader landscape, detailing the way this ever-contentious region has been used, altered, and understood from the colonial era to the present day. Newman journeys into colonial land use battles between Native Americans and European settlers, 19th-century utopian city planning, the rise of the American chemical industry in the 20th century, the transformation of environmental activism in the 1970s, and the memory of environmental disasters in our own time.

In an era of hydrofracking and renewed concern about nuclear waste disposal, Love Canal remains relevant. It is only by starting at the very beginning of the site’s environmental history that we can understand the road to a hazardous waste crisis in the 1970s-and to the global environmental justice movement it sparked.”

Disclosure: I received copies of Toto’s Tale and Love Canal from Net Galley. This post contains affiliate links.

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8 Responses to Mailbox Monday

  1. Elizabeth (Silver's Reviews) says:

    Toto’s Tale looks adorable.

    ENJOY your reading week.

    Elizabeth
    Silver’s Reviews
    My Mailbox Monday

  2. Pat @ Posting For Now says:

    Two very different books. Enjoy!

  3. Vicki says:

    Love Canal sounds good!

    • I’m interested in how they figured out what was happening and what did they about it. Niagra Falls sounds like it should be so healthy. Happy Reading!

  4. BermudaOnion (Kathy) says:

    I bet my sister would love Toto’s Tale too! Enjoy!