Mailbox Monday

Wishing everyone a happy, healthy 2016 filled with wonderful books. Two intriguing non-fiction books landed in my mailbox this week.

Here is the description from Amazon:
“Ranging from the playful, to the fact-filled, and to the thoughtful, this collection tracks the fortunes of Walt Disney’s flagship character. From the first full-fledged review of his screen debut in November 1928 to the present day, Mickey Mouse has won millions of fans and charmed even the harshest of critics. Almost half of the eighty-one texts in A Mickey Mouse Reader document the Mouse’s rise to glory from that first cartoon, Steamboat Willie, through his seventh year when his first color animation, The Band Concert, was released. They include two important early critiques, one by the American culture critic Gilbert Seldes and one by the famed English novelist E. M. Forster.”

Here is the description from Amazon:

“War, the most profitable economic activity in the ancient world, transferred wealth from the vanquished to the victor. Invasions, sieges, massacres, annexations, and mass deportations all redistributed property with dramatic consequences for kings and commoners alike. No conqueror ever captured more people or property in so short a lifetime than Alexander the Great in the late fourth century BC.

For all its savagery, the creation of Alexander’s empire has generally been hailed as a positive economic event for all concerned. Even those harshly critical of Alexander today tend to praise his plundering of Persia as a means of liberating the moribund resources of the East. To test this popular interpretation, The Treasures of Alexander the Great investigates the kinds and quantities of treasure seized by the Macedonian king, from gold and silver to land and slaves. It reveals what became of the king’s wealth and what Alexander’s redistribution of these vast resources can tell us about his much-disputed policies and personality.

Though Alexander owed his vast fortune to war, battle also distracted him from competently managing his spoils and much was wasted, embezzled, deliberately destroyed, or idled unprofitably. The Treasures of Alexander the Great provides a long-overdue and accessible account of Alexander’s wealth and its enormous impact on the ancient world.”

Disclosure: I received copies of A Mickey Mouse Reader and Treasures of Alexander the Great from Net Galley. This post contains affiliate links.

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6 Responses to Mailbox Monday

  1. Laura @Library of Clean Reads says:

    I also like reading non-fiction and these two do sound good. I would enjoy the first one but my hubby would love the second one.

  2. Cindy's Love of Books says:

    I have never heard of those books. I don’t read a lot of non fiction so that might be why… enjoy and happy reading

  3. BermudaOnion(Kathy) says:

    A Mickey Mouse Reader looks so fun!

  4. Elizabeth (Silver's Reviews) says:

    ENJOY your books.

    I like the looks of Treasures.

    Have a great week.

    Elizabeth
    Silver’s Reviews
    My Mailbox Monday

  5. Mary Ann Langan says:

    A nice mix in your mailbox,enjoy!

  6. Serena says:

    Happy reading