Herding Cats -”Don’t Let Anybody Tell You It’s Easy”

As these cowboys will tell you, anybody can herd cattle but herding cats –don’t let anybody tell you it’s easy:

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Enjoy a FREE Ebook: 9 Lives to Live April 25,26,27,28,29

Discover the secrets within two of a cool cat’s 9 Lives by downloading 9 Lives to Live FREE from April 25 through April 29. Here is the description from Amazon:

“If you had 9 Lives to Live, who would you live them with and why? Magical Cool Cat Tatania reveals the mystery of choosing her humans when one of her 9 lives becomes intertwined with the present in a daunting case of a disappearing spouse. Grace, Jack, and tuxedo cat Zeus pounce on clues with Tatania leading the way. MEOW”

You can download your free copy of 9 Lives to Live by clicking on the image above or the link below:

9 Lives to Live (Magical Cool Cats series Book 10)

And remember you can always read Kindle books on your tablet, smart phone, or computer with Free Kindle Reading Apps. You can download Free Kindle Reading Apps by clicking below:

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links.

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FREE – The book John Grisham says is his “most important”.

Here’s the description from Amazon for the book John Grisham has called his “most important”:

“John Grisham says THE TUMOR is the most important book he has ever written. In this short book, he provides readers with a fictional account of how a real, new medical technology could revolutionize the future of medicine by curing with sound.

THE TUMOR follows the present day experience of the fictional patient Paul, an otherwise healthy 35-year-old father who is diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor. Grisham takes readers through a detailed account of Paul’s treatment and his family’s experience that doesn’t end as we would hope. Grisham then explores an alternate future, where Paul is diagnosed with the same brain tumor at the same age, but in the year 2025, when a treatment called focused ultrasound is able to extend his life expectancy.

Focused ultrasound has the potential to treat not just brain tumors, but many other disorders, including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, hypertension, and prostate, breast and pancreatic cancer.

For more information, you can visit The Focused Ultrasound Foundation’s website. Here you will find a video of Grisham on the TEDx stage with the Foundation’s chairman and a Parkinson’s patient who brings the audience to its feet sharing her incredible story of a focused ultrasound “miracle.”

Readers will get a taste of the narrative they expect from Grisham, but this short book will also educate and inspire people to be hopeful about the future of medical innovation.”

John Grisham has generously made this medical knowledge accessible to everyone by offering The Tumor for free. You can download your free copy of The Tumor by clicking on the image above or the link below:

The Tumor: A Non-Legal Thriller

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links.

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Mailbox Monday

I love the idea of reading about the Wizard of Oz from the viewpoint of Dorothy’s dog, Toto. Here’s the description from Amazon:

“The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was written in 1900 by L. Frank Baum. Many other Oz books followed, as well as the famous 1939 movie. Not until now, however, does Toto tell the story, as he remembers it. In Toto’s Tale, we read his version of the beloved adventures. Toto tells how he first found Dorothy when she arrived in Kansas on an orphan train and how they were both adopted by Aunt Em and Uncle Henry. In the end, he says, the silver shoes (not ruby slippers as in the movie) weren’t lost in the desert, but put to good use.”

Here is the description from Amazon:

“In the summer of 1978, residents of Love Canal, a suburban development in Niagara Falls, NY, began protesting against the leaking toxic waste dump in their midst-a sixteen-acre site containing 100,000 barrels of chemical waste that anchored their neighborhood. Initially seeking evacuation, area activists soon found that they were engaged in a far larger battle over the meaning of America’s industrial past and its environmental future. The Love Canal protest movement inaugurated the era of grassroots environmentalism, spawning new anti-toxics laws and new models of ecological protest.

Historian Richard S. Newman examines the Love Canal crisis through the area’s broader landscape, detailing the way this ever-contentious region has been used, altered, and understood from the colonial era to the present day. Newman journeys into colonial land use battles between Native Americans and European settlers, 19th-century utopian city planning, the rise of the American chemical industry in the 20th century, the transformation of environmental activism in the 1970s, and the memory of environmental disasters in our own time.

In an era of hydrofracking and renewed concern about nuclear waste disposal, Love Canal remains relevant. It is only by starting at the very beginning of the site’s environmental history that we can understand the road to a hazardous waste crisis in the 1970s-and to the global environmental justice movement it sparked.”

Disclosure: I received copies of Toto’s Tale and Love Canal from Net Galley. This post contains affiliate links.

Posted in American History, Animals, Mailbox Monday | Tagged , , , , | 8 Comments

*Expired* FREE Cupcake Kitty March 27-31

Enjoy a FREE download of Cupcake Kitty from March 27-31. Here is the description from Amazon:

When a singer at an engagement party dies, romantic 1920s detectives, Grace and Jack, and their magical cats, Tatania and Zeus, jump on the trail of a killer that leads to TiJuana and a bootlegger’s doll: Cupcake Kitty.
“Magical white cat Tatania became impatient with her humans. She could smell a succulent sea bass on the other side of the door. To encourage her humans to open it, she emitted a deaf cat’s glass shattering meow. Zeus, her black and white feline companion, responded to her meow by putting his paws over his head and his rear end up in the air.
“How would you feel about spending a lot of time with me?” Jack asked.
“I feel like I already have,” Grace said.
“It only gets better.” He held up her hand and admired the emerald and diamond ring he’d bought her at Jessop & Sons jewelers last month. He moved it from her forefinger to her ring finger.
“Marry me?”
“Of course.”
He opened the door to the Hotel del Coronado’s Crown Room. A band played the Charleston for enthusiastic dancers. In the center of the dance floor, there was an ice sculpture of two magnificent cats.
“What’s going on?”"
“Our engagement party.”
“Why were you so sure I’d say yes?”
“I’m arrogant.”

You can download your free copy from Amazon by clicking on the image above or the text below:

Cupcake Kitty (Magical Cool Cats series Book 6)

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Also, “Kindle” means group of kittens and I suspect cats may be running Amazon.

Posted in 1920s, Animals, Cat, Free Ebooks, Roaring Twenties | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 14 Comments

Clever Cats

If any species could form an effective Army despite napping several times a day, it would be cats:) In Cool Cat Mysteries, cat sleuths solve mysteries without missing a nap.

How would you describe Bertrum Thumbcat — the cat leader in the cat video? Clever? Sneaky? Cute? Something else? Would you describe the cat on the cover of Cool Cat Mysteries the same way?

Posted in 1920s, Animals, Cat | Tagged , | 44 Comments

Mailbox Monday

I find people who have overcome adversity more interesting than people who have not and this true story about overcoming unexpected adversity sounds like a doozy. Here is the description from Amazon:

“Catherine Chagra and her two sisters, Cindy and Christa, were the darling daughters of Jimmy Chagra, the biggest pot dealer in the history of the U.S.A., and one of the kingpins of Las Vegas casinos in the 1970′s. But after their father was arrested and his hundred-million dollars had disappeared, they were left penniless, at the mercy of a Texas society that vilified them. With the help of their principled mother before her tragic death, and haunted by the shadow of their father, Dirty Darlings is a portrait of courage as three women attempt to re-assemble the shattered pieces of their lives.”

Disclosure: I received a copy of Dirty Darlings from Net Galley. This post contains affiliate links.

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Mailbox Monday

Wishing everyone a happy, healthy 2016 filled with wonderful books. Two intriguing non-fiction books landed in my mailbox this week.

Here is the description from Amazon:
“Ranging from the playful, to the fact-filled, and to the thoughtful, this collection tracks the fortunes of Walt Disney’s flagship character. From the first full-fledged review of his screen debut in November 1928 to the present day, Mickey Mouse has won millions of fans and charmed even the harshest of critics. Almost half of the eighty-one texts in A Mickey Mouse Reader document the Mouse’s rise to glory from that first cartoon, Steamboat Willie, through his seventh year when his first color animation, The Band Concert, was released. They include two important early critiques, one by the American culture critic Gilbert Seldes and one by the famed English novelist E. M. Forster.”

Here is the description from Amazon:

“War, the most profitable economic activity in the ancient world, transferred wealth from the vanquished to the victor. Invasions, sieges, massacres, annexations, and mass deportations all redistributed property with dramatic consequences for kings and commoners alike. No conqueror ever captured more people or property in so short a lifetime than Alexander the Great in the late fourth century BC.

For all its savagery, the creation of Alexander’s empire has generally been hailed as a positive economic event for all concerned. Even those harshly critical of Alexander today tend to praise his plundering of Persia as a means of liberating the moribund resources of the East. To test this popular interpretation, The Treasures of Alexander the Great investigates the kinds and quantities of treasure seized by the Macedonian king, from gold and silver to land and slaves. It reveals what became of the king’s wealth and what Alexander’s redistribution of these vast resources can tell us about his much-disputed policies and personality.

Though Alexander owed his vast fortune to war, battle also distracted him from competently managing his spoils and much was wasted, embezzled, deliberately destroyed, or idled unprofitably. The Treasures of Alexander the Great provides a long-overdue and accessible account of Alexander’s wealth and its enormous impact on the ancient world.”

Disclosure: I received copies of A Mickey Mouse Reader and Treasures of Alexander the Great from Net Galley. This post contains affiliate links.

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Mulligan’s Christmas Stew – Audiobook Review

Here is the description of Mulligan’s Christmas Stew from Audible:

“For more than 30 years as a roving reporter, AP pecial correspondent (and legendary storyteller) Hugh Mulligan wrote witty, quirky, and sometimes poignant Christmas columns from many distant datelines. Whether he was writing from London or Austria, Israel or Vietnam, or the snows of Greenland and the Canadian Arctic, Mulligan managed to capture the essence of the holiday spirit for all to enjoy.

Now The Associated Press has assembled these delightful stories in a new collection, Mulligan’s Christmas Stew. This serving of tasty tales is sprinkled with humorous and touching observations as well as enchanting reminders about the joy and reflection the time of the year brings to all, both young and old. The volume features an introduction by Malachy McCourt as well as Christmas quizzes and artifacts from the AP corporate archives.

Mulligan’s Christmas Stew is a journey through the world of Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, Clement C. Moore’s “The Night Before Christmas”, the birth of Christmas carols, the real cost of “The 12 Days of Christmas”, Christmas at the White House, and so much more! Have yourself a Merry Mulligan Christmas!”

I thought the title, Mulligan’s Christmas Stew, came from the author’s name, Hugh Mulligan, but it sounded very familiar and I looked up the definition:

Mulligan Stew: a stew made of available ingredients; a stew made of odds and ends

In this instance, the ingredients are the Christmas columns of a journalist who relished Christmas stories. Hugh Mulligan’s love for history shines through when he writes of December 1776. George Washington embodied the resilience that would define America when he crossed the Delaware River and surprised the Hessian troops hired by the British at Trenton who were imbibing liquor and undoubtedly already celebrating what they believed would be America’s defeat.

He shares the origins of Christmas Carols. Rudolph the Rednosed Reindeer’s writer knew it would be a hit. For a long time, no one else agreed. He took it to a singing cowboy named Gene Autry. Although Gene Autry originally turned down the opportunity to sing Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer, his wife changed his mind. In its first year of release, Gene Autry’s rendition of Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer sold 1,700,000 copies and never stopped selling.

One year he watches workers decorate Rockefeller Center’s Christmas Tree and learns they begin decorating from neither top nor bottom but from the middle. Another year, he calculates the costs of giving your true love gifts immortalized in The 12 Days of Christmas. He watches a drunk Santa Claus get transported away while still singing Jingle Bells.

Narrator Malachy McCourt has the confidence of a natural storyteller. I enjoyed listening to this collection of Christmas stories. It includes a fun quiz about Christmas. You can download the quiz from Audible if you buy the audiobook edition.

You can see Mulligan’s Christmas Stew by clicking on the image above or the link below:

Mulligan’s Christmas Stew: A Tasty Serving of Holiday Stories

Disclosure: I received a copy of Mulligan’s Christmas Stew from Audible in exchange for an honest review. This post contains affiliate links.

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Mailbox Monday

I have a pre-order for the audiobook edition of Mulligan’s Christmas Stew. I want to listen to this author’s stories about celebrating Christmas all over the world through the years.
Here is the description from Amazon:

“For more than 30 years as a roving reporter, AP pecial correspondent (and legendary storyteller) Hugh Mulligan wrote witty, quirky, and sometimes poignant Christmas columns from many distant datelines. Whether he was writing from London or Austria, Israel or Vietnam, or the snows of Greenland and the Canadian Arctic, Mulligan managed to capture the essence of the holiday spirit for all to enjoy.

Now The Associated Press has assembled these delightful stories in a new collection, Mulligan’s Christmas Stew. This serving of tasty tales is sprinkled with humorous and touching observations as well as enchanting reminders about the joy and reflection the time of the year brings to all, both young and old. The volume features an introduction by Malachy McCourt as well as Christmas quizzes and artifacts from the AP corporate archives.

Mulligan’s Christmas Stew is a journey through the world of Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, Clement C. Moore’s “The Night Before Christmas”, the birth of Christmas carols, the real cost of “The 12 Days of Christmas”, Christmas at the White House, and so much more! Have yourself a Merry Mulligan Christmas!”

I love the 1920s and this true story of a fatal mistress intrigued me. Here is the description from Amazon:

“JAKE & CLARA is based on a true story from the dawn of the Jazz Age about scandal, politics, Hollywood—and murder. When Warren Harding won the White House in 1920, his campaign received millions from Jake Hamon—“The Oil King of Oklahoma.” Harding planned to make Jake the most powerful businessman in America. But Mrs. Harding (some called her “The Duchess”) had one condition—the married man had to end his affair with his long-time mistress, a girl named Clara.

Jake and Clara had been together for ten years, since she was seventeen and he was thirty-seven. But Jake coveted the powerful Washington job, and he dumped Clara a couple of weeks after Harding was elected.

A few days later, Clara shot Jake.

By the time Jake died, Clara was in the wind. A headline-grabbing national search was conducted for the beautiful fugitive. Clara “sightings” were reported far and wide. A pair of colorful lawmen found Clara in an unlikely hiding place and brought her back to Ardmore, Oklahoma to face the charge of first-degree murder.

What followed was one of the most sensational murder trials of the era. A “dream team” of powerful lawyers surrounded Clara in the courtroom. Soon Hollywood came calling, wanting to put Clara’s story on the big screen…

…starring Clara as herself”

Disclosure: I received a pre-order of Mulligan’s Christmas Stew from Audible and a copy of Jake and Clara from Net Galley. This post contains affiliate links.

Posted in 1920s, American History, Audiobooks, History, Mailbox Monday | Tagged , , , , , | 14 Comments